Why You Shouldn’t Stay At A Hotel

written by Carolyn Chon May 5, 2015

Traveling these days are becoming more accessible to most of us, from staying in an all-out luxurious resort like the Four Seasons, to staying in an eye-candy loft in NYC via AirBnb or even staying for absolutely no-cost on a stranger’s couch. Point is, in this current generation of technology, we are so fortunate to be spoiled with so many options and how easily accessible these places all are. So, my question to you is, have you stepped outside your conservative style of planning a trip or a holiday? Have you opened up to the idea of staying in someone else’s house? Have you opened up to sleeping on a boat or in a farm?

Here are five alternatives why you shouldn’t stay at a hotel and should try out for your next trip!

1. AIRBNB – LINK

Old Smock Windmill in rural Kent, UK.

Old Smock Windmill in rural Kent, UK.

 

B&B in a castle in Tuscany, Italy.

B&B in a castle in Tuscany, Italy.

 

Treehouse in Atlanta, Georgia - US.

Treehouse in Atlanta, Georgia – US.

 

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that Airbnb is on the top of our list, as it provides not only affordable stays, but it also often gives us an interesting variety to choose from.  If someone were to tell me ten year I would be able to stay in a tree house, or a boat or even in an airplane I would’ve told them that there were crazy, but not anymore!! Not only does Airbnb give us a wide range of selection, it also at most times (in my own experience) come with good hosts. Some of which also go the extra mile to make sure your stay is pleasant and memorable.

 

2. COUCHSURFING – LINK

I recommend Couchsurfing to any and everyone who is planning their first backpack trip, or their first big trip, or a low-budget trip. Personally, I got bitten by the travel bug when I first discovered Couchsurfing some 8 or 9 years ago. The best thing about Couchsurfing besides it being absolutely free, is the way you get to live and experience the local culture and lifestyle, of course this can only happen if you have a good host.

How does Couchsurfing work?

Think of it as Airbnb, except that it’s for free and sometimes you really end up just sleeping on the couch if your host doesn’t have a spare room or bed for you. One thing I like about it is that the host that I’ve had throughout my stays from way down south, New Zealand and right up-to Europe is that I’ve made so many wonderful new friends and seen the things only a local would see. Give Couchsurfing a try if you haven’t already, but of course it also goes without saying that you should always practice precaution when finding a host or hosting a guest yourself.

 

3. WORKAWAY – LINK

Permaculture project in Ecuador.

Permaculture project in Ecuador.

 

Volunteering in a B&B in Ireland.

Volunteering in a B&B in Ireland.

 

Workaway is another really, really great way to see the world, especially if you have lots of time to spare. Basically, how workaway works is that it functions as a barter trade system, where you offer your time to help in various sorts of ways (ranging from cooking, to teaching a language, to helping build something, to farming etc), and in exchange you usually get free accommodation and sometimes food too.

If you’ve always dreamed of going to a particular country to immerse in their culture and learn as much as you can from there, I reckon Workaway is a great option! You can find a Workaway project/destination pretty much any where in the world. What are you waiting for?

4. HOUSESIT – MINDMYHOUSE , HOUSESITTINGWORLD , TRUSTEDHOUSESITTERS , HOMEEXCHANGE

Kea, Greece.

Kea, Greece.

 

There’s quite a number of house sitting sites out there, some more unique to certain parts of the world. I suppose this is somewhat similar to Airbnb except that you pay in kind by taking care of the person’s house while they are away. That said, if you’re not someone who is clean, tidy and responsible, this is definitely Not for you. I imagine housesitting are for the travelers who are looking for a nice peaceful place to stay, that at the same time they make “play house” for the duration of the agreed housesitting time.

Home Exchange is also very similar to housesitting, except that you too are supposed to put up your home to be housesat by someone as well. I think it’s a nice way for like-minded travelers who are seeking to stay in a home rather than a hotel.

5. GLAMPING – LINK

Chiawa Camp, Zambia.

Chiawa Camp, Zambia.

Montana, USA.

Montana, USA.

As Hanie posted sometime last year, Glamping Spots in Asia and Australia, glamping is pretty much a term of a more high-end or luxurious style of camping, combining the word Glam + Camping. So, if you’ve always wanted to go camping but could possibly be too much of a city dweller to go to the loo in nature itself, this might just be the right thing for you!

So, now that you know these few more extra alternatives to making your next trip more fun and exciting, which are you going to opt for?!

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